El Paso

El Paso and Dayton this time. My heart is breaking for those mourning today, for those whose lives will never, not ever be the same. It breaks along with yours for those who met their deaths incomprehensibly whilst out on simple shopping errands, whilst out for a fun evening.  As I struggle, again, to work my head around the incomprehensible, I’m ever so slightly comforted in knowing that as surely as hatred won the day the overwhelming presence of compassion and courage is also evident in the reports from many of the survivors of these tragic horrors.

A news report about this devil of a man who perpetrated the slaughter in El Paso spoke of the manifesto he had recently posted. Details are sketchy but apparently he had written that everything he was raised to believe he could have in life is not, in fact, available to him.  As a white American male he had been raised to believe that his education would guarantee him a job that with hard work would in turn provide a decent living, a home in which he would be able to nurture an eventual wife and family. At the ripe old age of 21…sitting at the cusp of everything, he was consumed with a blinding rage that had seemingly blotted out his horizon. He believed the steady march of high tech jobs combined with the inflow of immigrants had irretrievably dashed all his dreams. You can practically hear the crunching of the white patriarchal industrial age in those misguided sentiments.  You can also witness the utter failure of his education to instill in him what I believe to be the American spirit. One with grit that charges the individual with the responsibility that comes with freedom to make your own life. He is correct that high tech is steam rolling all of us but where was his “Then what” thought? Where was the imagination to adjust? Where was even the glimmer of rationality that there was a way forward other than all consuming hatred? Are we still America if we, as a nation, loose this essence?

The world moves at a lightening pace now but even the world I was raised to negotiate was not the world I entered into. I was taught how to curtsy, how to polish silver, how to write a thank you note on good stationary with a fountain pen, make a square meal, organize a kitchen. These were the crucial survival tools carefully placed by my loving parents in my sister’s and my life tool belts. My sister and I both entered a world at the boil of the women’s movement where those tools were sorely inadequate.  I mean, a curtsy?  We were launched out of the nest into a world where we were to burn our bras, not get married, not get “saddled with kids”, certainly not be beholding or indeed strapped to any man but rather we were to make our own way.  I suppose this is a cross for every generation: The world changes and people adjust in order to thrive.

What was the twisted seed that got planted in his psyche that grew to make rage his response? What irrational demon caught hold of his spirit to conclude that mass slaughter was a solution? What could have been done to pull him into our 21st century in the gorgeous global reality and healthy diversity we are privileged to live in? These questions pound in my head because the hatred with which this man erupted is not his alone. Education conquers ignorance, rationality conquers irrationality, laws should control guns, knowing dissolves prejudice, love conquers hate. There are solutions and they must be vigorously sought if we are to stem this unbearable tide.

 

The Guardian

In the early 1960 my Dad’s career moved the family to Tokyo, where my sister and I got to grow up. Once there, the first line of business for my Mom was to find a home for us and after a couple of months living at the Hotel New Japan, she found a great one. It was a big rambly house, full of character and idiosyncrasies. Half the house was of western design and was ours to live in; the other half was of traditional Japanese design and was the residence of our landlord, Mr. Akebana, an elegant Japanese gentleman. Our half was bare when we moved in save for a wooden statue of an early Japanese Jesuit priest, dressed in kimono. He wore a rosary and a sword…a sword not to kill a possible offender but rather to kill himself in the likely event he would be persecuted for being a Christian. A classic east meets west paradigm. Mr. Akebana told Mother that the statue had long lived in the Western wing of his, now our, home and that it was the Guardian of the house. He asked if the statue might stay put. Mother was delighted to comply.

We know nothing of Mr. Akebana’s life except that he would have lived in Tokyo through the war, had this enormous estate and grandiose home smack in the middle of town and lived with his sour step-sister. My memory of him is that he was a sad and contemplative man, always dressed in shibui toned kimonos. It must have been quite something for this Japanese survivor of WWII to permit an American family to live in his home.

Our side of the residence eventually boasted dogs, cats, hot and cold running flow of international house guests, homework, sleepovers, fancy dinners, kitchen suppers, climbing trees in the backyard…it was a happy and privileged life.

When after ten years we were moving to another home, Mr. Akebana over the protestations of the sour step-sister, insisted Mother take the Guardian with her. That statue, a particular favorite of Mother’s, eventually returned to the States with them when my folks retired.

Six and a half years ago at a ripe old age, my Mom entered hospice and I became her primary caregiver. About two weeks prior to her demise I went to a little nail shop not far from my parents’ home and asked if one of the manicurists might consider coming to the house to tend to Mother’s nails. The gals declined siting the situation as too unusual but a gentleman stepped up and within minutes he was following me up the hill to the folk’s home. As we came into the house the Vietnamese manicurist, Tony, took off his shoes. He started noticing the Asian art and once in the living room spotted the Guardian. He knew immediately who it was…a famous figure of Christian advancement for Asia. With that we went to Mother’s bedroom where he greeted her with a beaming smile. Tony worked on Mother for well over an hour. I could hear them laughing and giggling…when I checked back in he was massaging her feet and said “I wish I was her son, then I could do this every day.” As he was leaving he flatly refused to take any money for his efforts. I forced a little vase on him which he reluctantly accepted. A few minutes later, the doorbell rang and it was Tony with a wooden rosary and cross. He asked that I give it to Mother. What was so startling is that it looked precisely like the rosary carved into the wooden statue made to look as if the Guardian himself were carrying it. It was as if, through this angelic stranger, the Guardian had given Mother his rosary.  Mom was as astonished by the gift and she held that rosary over her last days absorbing the comfort it afforded.

Six years ago…. and Tony’s gift still astonishes me. Death, I learned, gathers angels be they on this or that side of the veil.

Pink Drapes

New chapters I’ve learned can take you to places or situations you’d never have pictured yourself in. For instance not so long ago, I took over my parent’s home. It’s that time of life.  I bought it shortly after Mom died. It was the only way to keep my then 98 year old Dad in his own home over his end of days and having just lost his bride of 72 years, it seemed the right thing to do.  In the fullness of time my Dad also died in that home, just 26 days shy of 100, in his own bed and thank heavens, peacefully. 
 
So there I was..alone in their, now my, home.  Its a gracious property in the mountains and in the 20 or so years they had lived there they had made it beautiful. It housed their entire history…telling the tale of their long and good lives through the books, art and photos it held. New chapters however demand their own changes, symbolic moments perhaps of the new. Thinking along those lines, my eyes landed on Mom’s bedroom drapes. Pink drapes and, sorry Mom, I am not a pink person. What to do? The drapes were in great shape just not the right color. “Apricot!” I thought. “I can dye them apricot!” Off to the store to buy the dye.
The task ahead involved taking all twelve panels down and putting them, one by one, in the bathtub of hot water/dye solution and stomping on the soaking drapes for 20 minutes.  Because it was a messy job I figured best to do this in my birthday suit.  I did not foresee the fact that my feet and hands would turn flaming apricot. Never mind. Next step was to stuff the dyed and sopping panel into a big plastic bag,…schlep it to the washing machine, plop it in and while that was going return for the next round of stomping. Times twelve.
I timed the first panel and figured I had just the right amount of time before I had to be ready.  Ready for my dinner guests.  That night I was having my first dinner party at the house. Now, WHY I felt it was imperative to get the drapes done that particular afternoon is beyond me.  Apparently it was part of my inner ‘new chapter’ routine.  Anyway, most inconveniently my timing was off because just as I was putting the last panel into the washing machine, the door bell rang. This would have been fine except for the fact that of course I was buck naked and my clothes were on the other side of the house, past the front door and entry windows.  Doorbell dinging, dogs barking, I could but crawl stealthily below the windows as fast as possible in order to get to my clothes and throw them on so that I could then open the door to my waiting guests. They awaited their tardy hostess with the flaming apricot hands and feet and the rest of the evening went off without a hitch I’m relieved to report.
I cannot recommend this method of new chapter building as in my case, the drapes shrank.  Sorry again, Mom.  When I look at the new drapes now I think about that madwoman stomping in the bathtub.  What was driving me? Some caveman like urge to make a space my own? The whole episode seems tied to some ancient ritual designed to honor the old and bring in the new, it was connected to some primal need to create a line in the sand between then and now. A demarkation in the continuum.
Either that or I truly just don’t like pink drapes. Your call. 

Lesson in an Unexpected Place

had the chance the other day to go onto the NYSE floor. I’ve been a very modest and somewhat fearful investor for as long as I can remember. I figure as an artist I’ve more than used up my lifetime allotment for financial risk so I do not day trade but rather buy “for the long term” as the saying goes.  I’ve had the market explained to me by various financiers multiple times and must confess that I still do not really understand how it works. It seems like a sort gentle and sometimes not so gentle, conspiracy.  I have like so many of us, felt my stomach turn when the market dropped and been grateful for the bounces back up when they’ve come. I’ve also made enough exceedingly stupid buying and selling decisions to hurt and the occasional lucky ones too. The point is, the NYSE has occupied some percentage of my hours of fret on the planet, emotional and intellectual wattage as well and yet, I’d never been to the actual place, to the epicenter. Last week, I was granted a rare and privileged look inside mission control of capitalism.
 
One Jay Woods was there to greet us when we arrived. Having been on the floor for twenty years and clearly loving it, he was the best possible ambassador. Jay was not the rabid person we’ve all seen the in movies. He was rather a healthy young man, as concerned about his teenage son’s recent fender bender as he was the day’s trades. He single handedly afforded the NYSE a human face. Once past the security check, he moved us swiftly through the bowels of the building, guided us up a pristine white marble staircase and suddenly we were there in the market’s bustling midst. It was thrilling. A light filled, terribly high ceilinged marble room with slick wooden floors. These natural elements are the vessel in which the modern economy sails forth across its now virtual sea. Everyone onboard is engaged be it in front of a camera, behind a screen, negotiating a trade, clicking away at a keyboard. Time is compressed..…life happens in minutes, in seconds.  Seconds count.  You could almost feel the pulse of the global (any doubt that it is otherwise eradicated there) economy as a living breathing entity, see its emotions as they played across the faces of its collective body. 
 
How is it possible that so powerful, life changing, fortune building, bone crushing, history making a place is housed in so small a space with many but finite numbers of screens and participants?  On the floor, at least for me, the unmanageable was made manageable. The enormous was brought down to size, the surreal was made real. That happened in a handshake with Jay. Isn’t that how most monsters under the bed get humanized? In that moment when you can find common ground, breathe common air? Even in brief conversation it was clear that opinions on the floor are as diverse as they are across our great nation. Yet these folks work together to a common goal as they move commerce forward. Life lessons can be had in the most unexpected places.
Bridges are there for the building, handshakes are there for the bonding. Prejudices can be seen through, years of fear can be undone in a heartbeat. I learned and saw and experienced that on the floor of the NYSE.
Blue Pearl

Happy Mother’s Day

She died on a July afternoon at 3pm. It was peaceful and expected and she was in her own bed. Her husband of 72 years, my Dad and my sister were bedside on her right, I was on her left.  There were things to be done in the immediate aftermath. Call hospice. Call family members. Bathe and dress her one last time. Her body was still warm. The undertakers came. I watched them take her body out of the room. I looked away when they were about to zip up the black bag.  As the hearse pulled away down the drive a great clap of thunder rang out.

I remember wondering at about 5pm through my heaving sobs where I would find her again and where I would see her beautiful blue eyes again? My computer was still playing the song list I’d built for Mom. It was a long list and one we’d listened to almost non stop over her last months. Just then, the Pat Metheny song, Find Me In Your Dreams came on.  It did not seem like an accident.

A little while later the rain had stopped and I stepped outside. Looking up at a bright blue sky, there, I thought, that’s where I’ll see her blue eyes. Mom was everywhere.

Today, on Mother’s Day five years after her death she still is everywhere as is the ongoing expression of her love.  It’s as if her mothering essence was absorbed into the Great Mother Spirit in the sky to become yet another facet of its majesty. I see that loving spirit in the tender touch of a Mother to her child in it’s pram.  I feel it as a Mother, seated next to me on the plane, reads to her young child. I smile over it as yet another Mom explains to her hungry young son what they will have for dinner tonight in a passing conversation on the street.  I experience it in the pollen carrying wind. Mother love lives on.

Happy Mother’s Day Mom, wherever you are.
Blue Pearl

Wind Chimes

They were on the ground again. Darn. Those same wind chimes, big ones with tones I adore had come unstrung and lay mute in the leaves below the tree on which they were meant to be hanging. Not the end of the world to be sure but they were grace notes in the wind when properly hung and I missed them.

For the third time in six months I set about to repair them. Rooting around in the garage this time I found even stronger wire. Surely this repair would hold. I completed the task and hung the chimes just before I left for an extended few winter months away.

The season passed and eager to be home I pulled up the drive…all looked well at first glance except that not only were the chimes not on the tree they were not to be found on the ground beneath the tree. Mysterious. Winter must have been more brutal than usual I thought.

My brother in law called welcoming me home and asked if he could come by to drop something off. He and my sister live only a few minutes away, “Sure” I said. When they arrived he was carrying the wind chimes. Re-strung wind chimes. He is a retired surgeon and explained the procedure he had performed on the chimes…special wire, special knots, additional lacings. As he described his process I wondered when he had even registered that the chimes were down? I wondered if I would ever have thought to do something so kind for a relative or a friend? If unprompted, would I have gone out of my way to perform so laborious a task?

It’s just the kind of thing he used to do for my folks when they were alive. Swing by after a long day’s work just to check in, to change a light bulb, to bring an interesting newspaper article, to listen to one of their stories. He shows up. I think that’s one of the many reasons why my sister fell in love with him. He performs the tasks that don’t garner applause. He volunteers to do the jobs no one else wants or even thinks to do.

Years ago my life had taken a lousy turn. A divorced Mom, financially on my own with a young teenager to finish raising and educating, I was about to fall off a fiscal cliff. It was a very scary time and I was scrambling to figure out our way forward. During a painful discussion on possible options, my brother in law, who had been largely quiet during my ramblings, fell even more quiet. Then he said something remarkable. He told me I could move in with them if such time came as I needed to. It was an extraordinary offer and he was sincere in it. Suddenly I could breathe. Suddenly I had hope. His generosity of spirit bolstered me at a time I deeply needed bolstering. He didn’t have to issue that kindness, surely he knew it would have been greatly inconvenient for him and for my sister for my young son and I to move in with them…but he did it anyway.

As it turned out resilience, luck and life force all convened in my favor and we did not need to move in with them. Turned out it was just one of the life valleys I had to walk through but my steps had been made ever so much lighter having been companioned by so generous an offer. Now, when the wind chimes sing in the breeze I think of the kindness from my fine brother in law, of the many grace notes he continues to put in the lives of so many, including mine.

Blue Pearl

Black Hole

The front page of my paper this morning, yours too I imagine, had the astonishing photo…make that first photo ever, of a black hole.

The article says of black holes, that “If too much matter is crammed into one place, the cumulative force of gravity becomes overwhelming and the place becomes an eternal trap. Here, according to Einstein’s theory matter, space and time come to an end and vanish like a dream.” It goes on to state that equations in Einstein’s theory of general relativity “indicated that when too much matter or energy was concentrated in one place space-time would collapse, trapping matter and light in perpetuity.”

Also in the paper this morning was a new science report on even faster erosion in Alaska than previously found. Word that the US Attorney General without evidence is asserting one president spied on another. Word that, with the recent lowering of emissions standards, US automakers will be facing a divided consumer base. Word of immigration hell and Brexit mayhem. All that was just the front page. To my mind it was timely therefore that the headline for the first image of a black hole read “Peering in Light’s Graveyard”.

The dividing and virtual lens through which we view the world is mind bending. Sophisticated feeds of false information, fantastic conspiracy theories made to look real and false virtual identities abound. I heard three extraordinary journalists speak recently about how Facebook is quantifiably the documented conduit of misinformation through which unsavory leaders and referendums have risen to power. Duterte in the Philippines for one. Astonishingly, Brexit another.

The image of the black hole on the front page is ringed by what’s termed an event horizon…a blazing circle of fiery gases warning of the abyss. Feels to me sometimes that our own event horizon is within sight. There are days after reading the news I want to crawl back into bed and pull the covers over my head. There are nights I wake up with worry about our world and just hang on. Count me, in other words, amongst the throngs of concerned citizens.

I’ve lived long enough to see love dissolve hate. Long enough to experience that evil can be eradicated when love pulls its up by its roots. Long enough to know that rational thought can lead out of any mental jungle if we, as the 23rd Psalm encourages us to do, keep walking. So, to the best of our ability may we heed the event horizon’s warning and each have the courage to hold to that beautiful, bright light…to the true and loving and rational. I really don’t know how else we avoid getting sucked into the vortex.

Perhaps this near deep dive into the dark is the process of un-rooting it. If so, bring it on.

Blue Pearl